Repaired an LCD Monitor

A few weeks ago I repaired Melissa’s LCD Monitor. It was the first time I attempted to fix one, but I’ve worked inside a couple notebooks and computers for a while, and I figured that I could always try to sell the parts if I what I thought was wrong with it wasn’t. One day out of the blue, her screen turned off on its own. I switched out power cables, plugged it into another power strip, and then did an internet search for resolution. (Resolution, for a monitor problem… :)) The most likely culprit was the inverter-power board.

I found a place that sells inverters and power boards for a variety of LCDs, including hers, a Dell 1707FPc 17″ with built-in USB 2.0 hub. I had to pry open the plastic case of the monitor very carefully, so that it would look nice after I put it back together in the end. I also had to remove the metal shielding around the boards. so that I could identify the type of inverter/power board that I needed. The vendor had the wrong image up for the board, but they had the best price and were helpful in responding back to me when I emailed them a picture of the board I had for confirmation.

A few weeks ago I repaired Melissa’s LCD Monitor. It was the first time I attempted to fix one, but I’ve worked inside a couple notebooks and computers for a while, and I figured that I could always try to sell the parts if I what I thought was wrong with it wasn’t. One day out of the blue, her screen turned off on its own. I switched out power cables, plugged it into another power strip, and then did an internet search for resolution. (Resolution, for a monitor problem… :))  The most likely culprit was the inverter-power board.

I found a place that sells inverters and power boards for a variety of LCDs, including hers, a Dell 1707FPc 17″ with built-in USB 2.0 hub. I had to pry open the plastic case of the monitor very carefully, so that it would look nice after I put it back together in the end. I also had to remove the metal shielding around the boards. so that I could identify the type of inverter/power board that I needed. The vendor had the wrong image up for the board, but they had the best price and were helpful in responding back to me when I emailed them a picture of the board I had for confirmation.

Here is the image of the board.

Here is the back of the monitor, after removing the stand.

This is after removing the plastic case around the back and shielding around the side USB ports.

Here is the monitor with the boards of the case exposed.

The board on the left is the inverter/power board. The board in the middle is the display driver and connectors. The board on the left in the USB hub.

Creating 3D Objects For Fun And Profit

I’ve seen a lot a products and projects recently that involve using a computer to design objects in 3D and creating a physical object in the real world from it. Eventually, I would like to incorporate some of these into a future design business with Melissa.

The first is a really neat program called ZBrush from Pixologic, which essentially enables you to sculpt digitally. The interface looks like it shouldn’t have a difficult learning curve and costs $500 to 600.

There’s also a 3D scanner from NextEngine to scan objects into the computer, which is just under $2,500. I learned about this from an interesting project called Fab@Home, which is trying to bring rapid prototyping to the more technically inclined home user. While not cheap, around ~$2,300 to 4,000 depending on how much time you want to spend in building it. Its significantly cheaper than commercially available 3D printers, such as Z Corporation’s ZPrinter 450, which starts just under $40,000.

I recently found out about the CarveWright Woodworking System, a.k.a. the Sears Craftsman CompuCarve, which I’ve read can work with some plastics as well as various woods, which runs just under $2,000. For an additional $300, they also have a scan probe attachment to do another type of 3D scanning.

Quesadillas, The Next Frontier

Every once in a while, I get “creative” in the kitchen. Sometimes it involves mixing ingredients together that have no rhyme or reason, other than: “hey, I wonder how this will taste.” Melissa won’t let me forget of the almond cracker, peanut butter, half grape, and nutmeg incident.

The latest concoction was actually pretty good, at least to me, that is. I made quesadillas with corn tortillas, shredded cheddar cheese, chopped turkey bacon, thinly sliced Fuji apples, salt, and a light drizzle of cranberry raspberry vinaigrette.

I like acidic food, especially liberal use of red wine vinegar on salads and vegetable sushi. I’m not that crazy about hot and spicy foods though. Once or twice a year I might get some pepper jack cheese or add some red pepper flakes to conventional Mexican-style quesadillas.